What Are Florida’s Window Tinting Laws?

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Window tinting in Florida is more than a way to keep your ride looking cool – it’s a way to keep your ride cool in the blazing heat that is common throughout the year in the Sunshine State. However, laws regarding how you can tint your windows vary by state, and Florida has specific regulations in place for how dark your windows can be.

Understanding Window Tinting for Your Florida Car

Florida’s car window tinting laws came into play in 1991 to keep all drivers on the road safe. While tinted windows are a great tool for keeping your car cool in the hot sun and reducing glare, they can also be a danger to yourself and other drivers on the road. Cars with fully tinted windows appear more intimidating to other drivers and drivers can hide from police detection. They can also give a place to hide illegal passengers, cargo, or activities. Because of these dangers, each state has their own laws about the degree of tint allowed on a vehicle’s windows.

Visible Light Transmission

Window tint uses the Visible Light Transmission or VLT test. VLT refers to the amount of light allowed through a tinted window. Florida has very specific laws about how much VLT streams through your windows and tinted film. It varies based on the type of vehicle and the purpose. Here is a list of Florida requirements based on the type of vehicle you are driving:

Passenger Cars:

  • The windshield may only have tinting above the AS-1 line, and the tint must be non-reflective.
  • The front side windows may have tinting but must allow more than 28% VLT and may not be more than 25% reflective.
  • The back-side windows must allow more than 15% VLT and may not be more than 35% reflective.
  • The rear window must allow more than 15% VLT.

SUVs and Vans:

  • The windshield may only have tinting above the AS-1 line, and the tint must be non-reflective. This is the same as passenger cars.
  • The front side windows must allow more than 28% VLT and may not be more than 25% reflective.
  • The back side windows must allow more than 6% VLT and may not be more than 35% reflective.
  • The rear window must allow more than 6% VLT.

These laws were last updated in 2015 to keep drivers safe on the roads, but they are still relevant today. They can vary slightly from county to county, so it is always best to check in with your local laws before having your windows tinted to be sure they are compliant. A licensed shop should also be aware of any laws. Other safety requirements include:

  • No colored tints allowed under Florida Law.
  • Dual side mirrors must be present when any back windows have tinting.
  • An official sticker must be visible on the inside of the driver’s door jamb to certify that tinting on the vehicle is in accordance with the law.
  • Medical exceptions to the tinting law require special permission and documentation. Conditions include Lupus, Dermatomyositis, Albinism, total of racial vitiligo, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, autoimmune disorders, or other medical conditions which cause light sensitivity.

Enjoy Your Shades, But Be Sure to Be Legal

Don’t give the police a reason to stop you. Keep your windows at the appropriate level of tinting for your safety and the safety of others. A lot of research has helped to determine the appropriate levels of tinting to keep drivers and passengers safe on the road. It is important to stay within the legal limits to keep everyone safe while driving.